Hard lesson learned

I'm subbing, because that's the only work I can find in education. I am retired from the Navy, and spent most of my life serving others in that manner. I feel a responsibility to the kids of today, to see them on their way in the best shape for success. I had been subbing in Michigan, and due to a misinterpretation (or maybe not) by a couple of girls I was dropped from a school district I worked for.

I'd been put in a room under construction with no clock, nor access to the computer clock or phone. So, when a student asked me for the time, I used the only thing I had - my cell. The girls accused me of taking pictures of them.

The principal said he knew I'd not been doing it, but he 'had' to let me go anyway.

Fast forward to the only interview I've had for three years, despite hundreds of resumes and apps. I'm asked, "Have I ever been removed from a school or district for any reason?" So, being the honest guy that I am, I answer truthfully, and ask the interviewer if he'd like to see the letter from the principal exonerating me.

Nope, not interested, interview over and I'm out the door. So, lesson learned is this. Don't say anything if your situation is like mine.

Where education is concerned, we males are all half guilty, till proven half innocent.

Challenges of interviews and working in education

How frustrating to not get interviews and to be falsely accused.

It is a tight job market right now in many states. Particularly if you don't have unique skills in areas of high need (e.g. math, science or special needs). And in some states there is underemployment for teachers so there are others with more experience.

As for being careful - yes - especially if you are a substitute - but - even other places it's important to be thoughtful about how people will respond. From my experience - it's really important for parents to know me well. They have been my best defenders against problems.

Good luck in your continued job search.