MenTeach E-News - June 2015

MenTeach E-News
June 2015

1) Guest Blog: Reflections from a Male Educator of Color
2) Meet the Father of Paternity Leave - A Male Teacher
3) Don's Column "Just Say NO, to No Touch."
4) China to Offer Free Teacher Training to Men
5) 2015 Excellence in Teaching Awards - Jason Yabut
6) Eastern Kentucky University Academic Leadership Academy seeks to attract more males into teaching
7) Germany Attempts to Recruit Men into Child Care
8) One Day, Two Lives for a Male Student in Early Education
9) Meet the Mannies in the United Kingdom
10) Why aren't we doing more to encourage men to be primary school teachers?

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1) Guest Blog: Reflections from a Male Educator of Color
A few weeks ago, I had the honor of participating in the 2015 Male Educators of Color symposium, hosted by the Department of Education. We came to listen, learn, contribute and, most importantly, affirm our collective experiences as men of color in the nation building occupation of teaching and leading schools and districts. To see such commitment and expertise from men of color as far away as Hawaii and as close as Philadelphia was inspiring and it steeled my resolve to mentor new and aspiring male educators of color. Read the blog: http://www.menteach.org/node/2636

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2) Meet the Father of Paternity Leave - A Male Teacher
This week, the man most celebrated for his impact on paternity leave policies is Richard Branson: the Virgin founder made news by announcing that some employees at Virgin Management would be eligible for a full year of paid new-dad time off.

Almost exactly 45 years ago, a very different man—a teacher, not an executive—was the one making strides for paternity leave. His name was Gary Ackerman, and he was a teacher in New York City who had a daughter in late 1969. When his daughter was about 10 months old, he applied for a leave (without pay) for childcare purposes. As a resulting lawsuit laid out, the principal did not recommend to the district that Ackerman's application be approved; unsurprisingly, the superintendent followed suit by not approving the leave. Ackerman tried to appeal the decision several ways, and was told by many people that the childcare leave policies of the Board of Education only applied to female teachers. Read the story: http://www.menteach.org/node/2637

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3) Don's Column "Just Say NO, to No Touch."
Male early childhood (EC) educators face stereotypes that portray us as potential child abusers on a daily basis. Clearly, children must be protected from child abusers, yet a principle reason many men give for not entering or staying in the field of early childhood education (ECE) is fear of being accused of harming young children (Nelson, 2002). Only at their own peril do many male EC educators offer "the intimate pats, back rubs, caresses and leisurely holding on laps and in arms that little ones need" (Honig, 2005).

Is it any wonder that men pass over our profession in favor of something less perilous, like working at high altitudes, driving at high speeds, or operating dangerous machinery? Though no-touch prohibitions are commonly imposed on male EC educators from the moment we enter ECE, many of our female colleagues are now finding this appalling legacy is being passed on them. Read his editorial: http://www.menteach.org/node/2639

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4) China to Offer Free Teacher Training to Men
As the millions of students are busy choosing their future universities after the National College Entrance Examination, the news of free teacher's training places for male students in southeast China's Fujian Province has attracted much attention.

According to the official document issued by Fujian Provincial Education Department along with other three local departments, five teacher's training universities in the province will launch a pilot project by enrolling 500 male students in total and providing them with a free education in primary and kindergarten schooling. Read the article: http://www.menteach.org/node/2641
 
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5) 2015 Excellence in Teaching Awards - Jason Yabut
At the Excellence in Teaching Awards dinner last Thursday evening, First 5 San Francisco recognized nine outstanding teachers for their accomplishments, dedication, professionalism, and best practice in the care and education of children in the City's Preschool for All program. The evening was kicked off by First 5 San Francisco Executive Director, Laurel Kloomok who thanked staff, families, and administrators for their hard work in helping San Francisco to achieve one of the highest-quality preschool systems in the country. Ms. Kloomok said those receiving awards represented the best of San Francisco, and were a vivid representation of the clear commitment and dedication the over 100 professional early educators who attended the event exuded. See a video about Jason Yabut: http://www.menteach.org/node/2643

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6) Eastern Kentucky University Academic Leadership Academy seeks to attract more males into teaching
A group of Kentucky's future teachers recently spent a week expanding their minds on Eastern Kentucky University's campus.

The 16 middle school students were part of The Camp TRREE Academic Leadership Academy hosted by the University's College of Education and funded by the Kentucky Department of Education. Most of the students who attended June 8-13 were from Madison County, with a few from Fayette, Clark, Wayne and Woodford counties.

Now in its fourth year of operation, the objective of The Camp TRREE, which stands for Teacher Recruitment and Retention for Education Excellence, is to encourage young men to become teachers at the elementary and middle school levels, while increasing the educational preparedness and college readiness of the participants.

"The shortage of male teachers from all cultural backgrounds has been well documented," said Dr. Norman Powell, director for diversity initiatives and programs and associate professor in the College of Education. "It has continued to persist as a challenge for school districts across the nation. Less than four percent of the nation's three million plus teachers are males." Read the article: http://menteach.org/node/2645

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7) Germany Attempts to Recruit Men into Child Care
Generally speaking, gender equality in the U.S. and other Western countries has involved women moving into men's spheres. We have not seen an equivalent migration of men into women's spheres. Accordingly, while women have integrated many male occupations (they are now, for example, 50% or more of law and medical students), many female-dominated ones remain heavily female.

This is perhaps nowhere more true than in early childhood education. In a story about male childcare workers at Organizations, Occupations and Work, Lata Murti reports that only 5% of child care workers and 3% of pre-school teachers are male. Numbers are also low in other Western countries. In Germany, the average is 3.5% (and this includes all employees of child care centers, including custodians). Read the article: http://menteach.org/node/2649

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8) One Day, Two Lives for a Male Student in Early Education
Not very long ago, I was a 17-year-old teenager with no idea what I wanted to do after high school. I did not like school growing up, but I attended school so I could see my friends and of course because my parents were sending me out the door.

I grew up in a very small town and was very close to all of my friends and teachers. I felt like I was the most normal kid growing up. It seemed like I was a friend to almost everyone, participated in every sport I could and had a hobby for every day of the week. While growing up many people told me I would be a great teacher and that I should choose a career working with children. This idea was always in the back of my mind and it seemed like the most interesting career path at the time. Being given the opportunity to write this reflective article has solidified that I did choose the right career path and I am about to become a male early childhood teacher! Read his story: http://menteach.org/node/2650

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9) Meet the Mannies in the United Kingdom
Why don't more men consider a career in childcare? And why should we now, for the sake of our children, be trying to close the gender gap?

Paul Byron's pram is a sight to behold. Expertly equipped with everything he could possibly need in the course of a day's work, it holds snacks, water bottles, a first aid kit and, perhaps most importantly of all, a selection of much-cuddled soft toys which must not, under any circumstances, go walkabout. Read the article: http://www.menteach.org/node/2652

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10) Why aren't we doing more to encourage men to be primary school teachers?
Mothers outnumbered fathers at our primary school sports day last week in the normal ratio for a day in the working week – maybe 10/1.

Among the staff and volunteers organising the event, however, women outnumbered men by more like 20/1.

The only man making his presence felt was the nerd with the unusual enthusiasm for PA systems who is always allowed to install the mics and loudspeakers - with the result that every announcement flies away inaudibly like chaff on the wind.

The staff personnel board at the school's front door, which displays a photograph of everybody working there, includes at present not a single male face. The Department for Education claims that one in five new primary teachers is a man, but that figure is contradicted by the evidence of one's own eyes and also by more reliable sources. Read the article: http://www.menteach.org/node/2654

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