MenTeach E-News - May 2016

MenTeach E-News
May 2016

1) Men in ECE: Another Stereotype?
2) Gender Gaps Persist In Oklahoma Teacher, Superintendent Ranks
3) Male Teachers Claim Wage Discrimination
4) Northern California Men in Child Care Conference
5) They call him MISTER
6) Teaching becomes Brosnon's dream job
7) Philadelphia School District seeks to recruit minority teachers
8) The importance of male teachers
9) What's sex got to do with it? The preparation of elementary male teacher candidates
10) Pride and Passion - Men Teachers Graduating

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1) Men in ECE: Another Stereotype?
For two months I've been putting off writing a blogpost on Men in Early Childhood Education (ECE). I spoke to other male coworkers in the field of ECE in preparation for this assignment, prepared notes from my conversations, and racked my brain trying to come up with a focus for a blog on "Men in ECE". I still have no answers, but I do have a question: Why are men in ECE important? Or, better yet, why do we celebrate men who work with children?

At the beginning of the first all-staff meeting that I attended at Clayton, a standing ovation was given to all the males present in the room, for working in ECE. At the time I was proud, but as I started to unpeel the layers, like an onion, of what I thought it meant to be a male educator, I quickly realized how many stereotypes of the gender-job role were, well, stereotypes. As an organizational effort to embrace diversity in all forms, one of the most persistent stereotypes is the male teacher. Read the editorial: http://www.menteach.org/node/2886

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2) Gender Gaps Persist In Oklahoma Teacher, Superintendent Ranks
The teachers in K-12 classrooms in Oklahoma and other states historically were mostly women. Their bosses — the principals and superintendents — were mostly men.

In two of those jobs, not much has changed.

Nearly eight in 10 certified public-school teachers in Oklahoma are female, a ratio unchanged in the past decade, according to state Department of Education data acquired by Oklahoma Watch.

More than eight out of 10 superintendents are still men. The 18 percent share for female superintendents represents a gain of six percentage points since 2005, although there are now fewer superintendents.

The biggest change over many decades is in the principal's office. Men and women now split the positions almost 50-50, although a decade ago 55 percent of principals were women.

The persistent overall gender divide, and the striking disparities among teacher and superintendent ranks, remain troubling to some researchers and educators. Read the article: http://www.menteach.org/node/2887

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3) Male Teachers Claim Wage Discrimination
Nine male teachers are suing their Pennsylvania school district, claiming they're victims of an unfair and gendered pay scale that favors their female counterparts.

The federal lawsuit, filed on May 2, alleges that the Moon Area School District, located about 13 miles northwest of Pittsburgh, failed to comply with the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, and Section 1 of the Civil Rights Act of 1871.

The plaintiffs have accused the school district of hiring female teachers at higher pay levels while also giving them more credit for their prior teaching experience. The men claim their prior teaching experiences were not recognized at the same salary level. Read the article: http://menteach.org/node/2888

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4) Northern California Men in Child Care Conference
Northern California Men in Child Care Conference
October 22, 2016
8AM - 4:30PM
American River College
Sacramento, CA

See the conference: http://www.menteach.org/node/2868

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5) They call him MISTER
When Walter Lee was a young child, his poor, rural town of Eutawville near the banks of Lake Marion in Orangeburg County, built a new school. Somehow his father ended up with an old chalkboard and some school desks, which he brought home, and Lee would play teacher.

"When I came home, I would write down my to-do lists on the board, I would act like I was teaching," Lee said. "I had the desks, I had the chalk. I had the dry erase markers. I had the Post-it notes. I had the stapler. I had it all."

In third grade, Lee wrote an essay that he wanted to be "the world's greatest teacher."

But by high school, that dream had faded. He'd lost sight of his goals. His grades had slipped some, though he was still considered a leader in his school.

It just didn't make much sense for a young, African-American man to pursue a career in teaching. So he thought about business, music, English, religion, philosophy. Read the article: http://menteach.org/node/2889

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6) Teaching becomes Brosnon's dream job
Like many young people, Brosnon Siluuga dreamed of a career in sport or the gaming industry, but after following advice from family and friends, he became a teacher and hasn't looked back.

Brosnon graduated with a Bachelor of Education (Teaching) Primary from the University of Auckland on Friday. He now teaches Year 5 students at Papatoetoe East Primary.

"I love it! I can't wait to get up for school each day," he says.

"I can't wait to get there and see my students to ask how they are and what they did in the weekend and to help them learn and encourage them to be the best they can be. My students are what drive me each and every day to the best teacher and role model I can be."

As a teenager he shrugged off suggestions from his teachers at Marcellin College that he should teach. Instead he did a diploma of computer programming specialising in interactive gaming at Media Design School.

But after completing the diploma in 2011 he was finding it difficult to find work in the industry. His mother Diane was teaching at Holy Cross School in Papatoetoe and told him he should apply for a teacher aide position that was opening up at the school. Read the article: http://menteach.org/node/2895

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7) Philadelphia School District seeks to recruit minority teachers
School District of Philadelphia officials are striving to recruit minority teachers to help fill vacancies.

Philadelphia School Superintendent William Hite and Philadelphia Federation of Teachers President Jerry Jordan addressed the importance of increasing diversity in the district's workforce during a Philadelphia Tribune editorial board meeting this week.

The push for diversity comes as the district needs to fill 560 teacher vacancies for the next school year.

"Understanding that diversity of the children that we serve and the population of the city, it means that we have to be fully committed to ensuring that our workforce reflects that diversity," Hite said. "It's really important that our young people have experiences with individuals that look like them, who are from their community and who represent a picture of what our young students could aspire to become."

According to Hite, African Americans and Latinos represent about 29 percent of the district's 8,400 teachers.

Hite said the need for a more minority teachers is indicative of a national challenge. Read the article: http://menteach.org/node/2896

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8) The importance of male teachers
My daughter Avery's grade five teacher is a bit of an anomaly. Students build different models of paper airplanes to test hang time during the unit on aerodynamics. The kids help choose and order school supplies as an exercise in budgeting and mathematics. And, when learning about democracy in social studies, they put the concept into practice by signing petitions (most recently, to bring back dodge ball in gym class).

Her teacher is young and energetic, and relates well to the kids in the split five-six class at Colonel Walker, a Calgary public elementary school. What makes Jordan Neiger a rarity, however, isn't the lesson plan or a passion for teaching—it's his gender. Neiger is the only full-time male teacher at Avery's school.

Only 16 percent of elementary school teachers (kindergarten through grade six) with the Calgary Board of Education are men. Across the country, the gender gap is just as great: The most recent Statistics Canada data from the 2011 National Household Survey found the same percentage—16 percent—of teachers at the elementary level are men. What's more, that percentage has been falling slowly but surely for decades. The 1991 census showed that 17.3 percent of elementary teachers were male; by 2006, that number had decreased to 16.4. And Canada is not alone in this trend—in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States, men are under-represented in primary education teaching positions. Read the article: http://menteach.org/node/2898

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9) What's sex got to do with it? The preparation of elementary male teacher candidates
This paper examines the experiences and outcomes of male teacher candidates in the College of Education at a large university in California.

Design/methodology/approach
This mixed methods study highlights findings from the preliminary analysis of student records as well as qualitative observation notes from their university supervisors and master teachers during their student teaching placements. Comments from student teaching assistance plans and remediation tools from the College of Education, Field Placement Office were also used. It also included the quantitative analysis of enrollment data as well as mid- and final student teaching evaluations for one semester. This multiple data triangulation process was used to illuminate the unique challenges and successes of male teacher candidates and the variables that influence their outcomes. Read the abstract: http://www.menteach.org/node/2901

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10) Pride and Passion - Men Teachers Graduating
The month of May evokes in me a sense of pride and a renewed passion for the profession of teaching.  Perhaps it is due in part to the end of the year activities, or the pomp and circumstance of graduation, or merely the satisfaction of completing another year of teaching! Whatever the reason, I am honored to be called, teacher.

This year in particular, I was especially proud of my role as teacher because I was able to congratulate three male students who received their bachelor degrees in Early Childhood Education!  Each student has selected a different path to pursue with his degree; one will pursue his master's degree in education, one will be teaching second grade, and the third student, who chose to graduate without a license, will pursue a more personal goal.  I am proud to know that each of them has chosen to follow his own passion at this point in his life.

When reading over responses on spring course evaluation I was intrigued with the answers to this questions, what do you like most about the professor's teaching? It delighted my heart when I read the response, "Passion!"
 
The urban dictionary defines passion, as "more than enthusiasm or excitement but rather an ambitious action whereby one's heart, mind, body and soul go into something they feel is important." I have been reflecting upon the degree in which the heart and mind and soul of any teacher is invested in this noble profession and wonder specifically what actions students witness that they consider passionate. Read the editorial: http://www.menteach.org/node/2908

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Men in ECE: Another Stereotype?

FYI: The link to this story (http://www.menteach.org/node/2886) is invalid. Thx, Bob Adams