News

Where’s the man?

By Aaron Falk - HJNews.com - Logan, UT, USA
For Jayson Curtis, family is the reason to teach.

"I've had jobs in the past where I've worked 12-hour days," says the elementary education major at Utah State University. "I just missed so many birthday parties and things. ... I wanted to watch my daughter grow up."

But family - combined with a handful of other factors - is one of the reasons for a national shortage of male elementary school teachers, and a subsequent shortage of male role models in the classroom, officials say.

Men-only teacher training planned

New Zealand Herald - Auckland, New Zealand
A proposed men-only teacher training facility in Nelson could avoid discrimination rules if it proved boys had been disadvantaged in the past, the Human Rights Commission says.

The principal of prestigious boy's school Nelson College is so worried about the male teacher shortage he has suggested starting an in-house teacher training facility, the Press newspaper reported today.

Gary O'Shea suggested the college would take a small number of graduates for a one-year training course with a view to employing them at the school once qualified.

Classroom Distinctions - One man's classroom experience

By Tom Moore - New York Times
MenTeach: This opinion piece appeared in the New York Times.

Tom Moore, a 10th-grade history teacher at a public school in the Bronx, is writing a book about his teaching experiences.

Nelson College head wants to train male teachers

By Daniel Nielson - The Nelson Mail - New Zealand
Nelson College headmaster Gary O'Shea is so concerned about the lack of quality male teachers he is looking at establishing an in-school teacher training college.

He says it's getting harder to find good male teachers because the profession is becoming so "feminised".

His idea, which is yet to go before the board of trustees, would involve taking on just a few university graduates each year to train from scratch as teachers. All the training would be done on site.

Does the teacher's gender affect students' grades?

ABC News - Chicago
Would your son do better in school with a male teacher? What about your daughter with a female teacher?

A new study suggests that gender may be the key to ensuring your child's success in school, which in turn may be the answer to the academic troubles that many boys have.

"Overall, two-thirds of the D's and F's in American schools are received by the boys. We've got a drop-out rate that's increasing," explains Michael Gurian, author and family therapist.
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