News

Male teachers try to make a difference in the classroom

By Donna Holman - T & D, Orangeburg, SC, USA
Jacob Smith is a first-year math and science instructor at Carver-Edisto Middle School in Orangeburg Consolidated School District Four in Cope, but he's no neophyte when it comes to working with male students.

Smith has been working for the past five years as a youth program director at Branchville High School. He has a bachelor's degree in psychology and a master's degree in elementary education.

Schools Seek a Few Good Men - Districts Try to Increase the Number of Male Elementary School Teachers

By Bob Jamieson, ABC News
In a cheerful, colorfully decorated classroom at Alexander Elementary School in a poor, gloomy neighborhood of Greenville, S.C., Damon Qualls is surrounded by eager fifth graders. As he reads from a biography of Eleanor Roosevelt, the 15 fifth graders give him their complete attention, a measure of respect for Qualls in only his third year as a teacher.

Men in Early Child Care and Teaching Summit - New Zealand

“Kiwi Men Can Do Anything”

The Childforum Research Network warmly invites you to the inaugural national meeting of men in early childhood care and education services. This is a very important event for the sector. Please help by spreading the word and forwarding this notice to people you know who will be interested, and especially male teachers and volunteers.

The Summit is for:

Repeat after me: we need more men

By Cristina Odone - Guardian, UK
I have been immobilised by flu, so my husband offered to pick up our daughter from nursery earlier last week.

Isabella looked worried: 'Ooooooooh, I don't know if they allow men in our school,' she said as she shook her head.

I suddenly realised that both her (co-ed) nursery and the (co-ed) primary school it is attached to are men-free zones.

Where have all the male teachers gone?

Goodbye, Mr. Chips: Male teachers scarce

By Casey Parks - The Oregonian
One group puts the percentage of male teachers in the U.S. at a 40-year low, with Oregon doing better than most states. Some say the disparity hurts students

BEAVERTON -- No matter how unruly a class gets, when P.J. Hanson walks into the room all the kids sit up straight. "It's so weird," the second-grade teacher at Chehalem Elementary School says. "There are women who are tougher and more firm, but kids sometimes still won't listen. But because I'm a man, they really respond."
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