Articles

Alabama Voices: Someone missing from schools

By Courtney S. Giles
Cuts in education funding have influenced a shift in our focal points regarding the quality of education in the public sector. While the No Child Left Behind Act implications are based upon that of every school in the nation accounting for 100 percent in terms of Adequate Yearly Progress, the achievement gap between majority and minority students remains and is continuously widening.

Teaching is one of the most important professions

A National Education Association (NEA) report indicates that there are 785,151 male teachers in public elementary and secondary schools across the nation compared to 2.4 million women.

While middle school and high school may have brought a few more male teachers into the mix, the truth is, the teaching profession was and really still is, dominated by women.

Lack of Male Teachers Worries China

Members of the 13th Nanjing Municipal Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) from the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) put forward a proposal calling for social attention to the issue that a lack of male teachers hinders the development of students on January 12.

Early childhood group for male educators in Wisconsin

UW-STOUT NEWS BUREAU
Early childhood education has been a female-dominated profession for generations.

According to 2011-12 National Education Association statistics, just 16.2 percent of elementary school teachers in the U.S. are men; in Wisconsin it’s 21.5 percent.

Out Of 1,883 Teachers, 56 Black Males

by Melissa Bailey - New Haven Independent
In his 14 years as a New Haven public-school student, Harold Cooper has never had a black male teacher. He’s not alone.

Harold, a 17-year-old Hillhouse High School senior, said he feels black male teachers can “relate more to the students.” He doesn’t know for sure, because in all of his schooling since pre-K, he has never had one.

Where Are All the Caring Men?

by Nick Clements - Huffington Post - UK
For 25 years I worked as an artist in schools. Whilst doing this I was constantly being swamped, observed, followed and interrogated (in a nice way) by the children. At first I thought this was because I wasn't a teacher, but I later realised it was also because I am a man.

I am now employed as a consultant in a wide range of health and care settings, not just schools, and I am still a very rare animal. A brief scan of Google confirmed my solitude:

'Mannies' On The Rise In New Trends for Child Care

Founder of 'NYC Mannies' says male babysitters do job just as well as a female nanny.

Watch the video.

Jury finds girls, parents liable for calling teacher 'perv' and awards $362,653

By Tracey Kaplan - San Jose Mercury News
Two years after San Jose schoolgirls branded a teacher as a "perv" and "creeper" who inappropriately touched kids and peeked into their restroom, a civil jury Friday found the children and their parents financially liable for defamation in a case that pitted the rights of the accused against the aim of reporting perceived abuse.

Misconduct allegations complicate work for male teachers, coaches

By Carl Love - Special to The Press-Enterprise
Allegations of sexual misconduct by coaches and teachers mess things up for guys like me.

Such a case recently arose against a Temecula softball coach, who prosecutors charged with molesting four young girls. The coach, Alex Flores, has pleaded not guilty and is being held on bail of $1 million.

Flores led a travel softball team of 13-year-old girls. In an affidavit asking a judge to set a high bail amount for Flores, Detective Rachael Frost called him "a well-liked and charismatic coach."

Book: Gender, Race, and the Politics of Role Modelling The Influence of Male Teachers

by Wayne Martino & Goli Rezai-Rashti
This book provides an illuminating account of teachers’ own reflections on their experiences of teaching in urban schools. It was conceived as a direct response to policy-related and media-generated concerns about male teacher shortage and offers a critique of the call for more male role models in elementary schools to address important issues regarding gender, race and the politics of representation.

Male Teachers in North Carolina

by Amanda Greene - StarNews Online
Chuck Gore retired from the Navy as a commander after 24 years, but he took his nautical love into his second-grade classroom at Carolina Beach Elementary School when he entered his next career as a teacher.

Students are gunner's mates, signalmen and quartermasters sailing on the U.S.S. Excel.

"Welcome aboard" is the standard greeting for visitors.

Former coach influencing lives as special education teacher

By David A. Schwartz - Sun-Sentinel Staff Writer
Teachers at Spanish River Community High School in Boca Raton call Ray Berger the "gentle giant." His former football players call him "coach."

A big man, Berger works with almost 30 special needs students, many of whom have severe physical disabilities. Now the school's "crisis intervention" teacher, Berger, 50, is respected, not feared.

Increasingly, male teachers found at head of elementary class

by Kevin Simpson - The Denver Post
"Kids had issues with me being a strong figure. They're used to hearing it from their moms or aunts." Tyrone Johnson, above, a third-grade teacher at Ashley Elementary (Andy Cross, The Denver Post)

Each weekday, students filing into Denver's Ashley Elementary School come face to face with a relatively rare educational experience.

Hiring Males Is School District Priority

by Gretchen Phillips - SoMdNews
Male teachers continue to be an area of need for Charles County and the state.

The school system’s human resources department reported to the Charles County Board of Education on Tuesday that of the 170 new hires, 37, or 21.8 percent were men, and 132 or 78.2 percent were women.

Sean McDonald, human resources specialist, told board members that the figure is on par with state figures. He said state data indicate that of those studying education in Maryland colleges and universities 81.4 percent are female.

The U.S. Teach Campaign to recruit more male teachers

By Ryan Houston - WSFA.com News
The Federal Teach campaign was designed to get more minorities, especially men into teaching.  An estimated 1 million teachers will retire in the coming decade, and that means there will be a lot of positions to fill.

Education leaders want to fill some of the openings with a more diverse workforce. Christopher Drake has been teaching at Robert Cross Elementary for 18 years.

To Recruit More Black Male Teachers, Retain Those You Have

by Chase Niesner - LA School Report
New research sponsored by the National Academy of Education seeks a deeper understanding of  why there are so few black male teachers in U.S. public schools.

The End of the Male Teacher: Seniority Rules

By Alan Haskvitz - TeachersNet Gazette
More lucrative occupations, cutbacks in salaries, fear of harassment charges, and possible parent bias against them are driving men from the K-12 teaching field. But the unseen culprit in this demise could be seniority.

More male elementary school teachers

by Kelly Schlicht - Fox 11
It's story time in Christopher Becker's kindergarten classroom.

Becker says having a man teach kindergarten is no tall tale.

"They usually assume they're going to get a female teacher until fourth or fifth grade. Whether it's kindergarten or fifth grade, I think males in that role are extremely important. You don't see a whole lot of them,” said Becker.

The Green Bay Area Public School District says last school year it had 899 elementary school teachers. 86 of whom were male.

Men in the classroom: Back to the basics of primary

Simcoe County - Canada
When Henry Yahn originally wanted to go into teaching, he wanted to teach high school physical education.

That’s a long way from where he is today – where he’s having not only lots of fun, but also where he’s finding lots of satisfaction.

Yahn teaches Grade 1.

Male teachers serving as role models at Rockford daycare centers

By Nicholas La Salla - Rockfordparent.com
In a career field dominated by women, male daycare teachers are making a difference in the lives of Rockford children.

Mister Rogers viral image: The story of the boy

By Maura Judkis - The Washington Post
The boy's name was Tommy Paulhamus. The "was" should tell you that his story does not have a happy ending. But on the day my father captured the now-iconic image of him with Mister Rogers in 1978, which was widely shared after the Newtown shootings — when he was not yet five years old, living in what was then called the Home for Crippled Children — Tommy was quite happy, indeed.

Nisswa resident one of few men in early childhood education

By Jessica Larsen - Staff Writer - Brainerd Dispatch
Bill Cruz is not your average student.

In fact, he’s the exact opposite of the 19-year-old white woman that typically sits in the desk of Jeanette Rydberg’s early childhood classes.

At 47, Cruz is the second man in two decades to graduate from Central Lakes College’s Early Childhood AAS program at the Brainerd campus.

That’s something both he and Rydberg want to change.

Special Education Doctoral student is Florida’s 2013 Teacher of the Year

By Martin Haro - Florida International University


When pre-K, special education teacher Alexandre Lopes stood on stage at the 2013 Florida Department of Education/Macy’s Teacher of the Year Award ceremony in Orlando the evening of July 12, he fully expected to hear the name of one the other four Teacher of the Year finalists announced as the winner.

Maths teacher James Whiteley nominated for Pride of Australia Medal

by Kara Vickery - PerthNow
He's the man who made a difference.

When students were ready to drop out of Willetton Senior High School, they decided to try again because of him.

When one girl didn't attend classes because she had depression, he was the one who rang her at home every day to see if she was all right.

That man is maths teacher James Whiteley, whose lessons in life went way beyond the classroom.

Movie: Children of Life

JapaneseMr. Kanamori, a teacher of a 4th grade class, teaches his students not only how to be students, but how to live. He gives them lessons on teamwork, community, the importance of openness, how to cope, and the harm caused by bullying.

Teacher of Year Davis tries to meet students where they are

By Andy Powell - Times Staff Writer
Selling cellphones might seem to be a far cry from teaching young children, but Matt Davis, the Attalla school system elementary school teacher of the year, believes his business background is a big asset.

South Carolina has 1st male Head Start teacher of the year.

By Linda Conley - (Spartanburg) Herald Journal
When a young child can identify shapes, colors and numbers, it is like planting a seed to produce good fruit for head start teacher Marcus Tate.

Nurturing a seed carefully is a lesson he learned growing up while working on the farm with his grandfather in Cherokee County. Tate, a teacher at Piedmont Community Action's Z.L. Madden Head Start Center in Spartanburg, has transferred some of those gardening tips to the classroom.

My Quest to Teach: African American Men and Teaching

by William Jackson
The recent news reports about the lack of African American teachers has caused concern that men are not choosing the profession of education. As an African American teacher at an elementary school and third generation educator. I find that effectively teaching African American youth does not rest in having more African American male teachers present in the classroom as teachers and administrators, male teachers must have a passion to teach.

Hoping Black male teachers make a difference

By Nisa Islam Muhammad - The Final Call
Spend an hour at Maya Angelou Public Charter Middle School and you immediately notice something's different. There's an abundance of Black men and they're not just custodians or security.

Advocates say schools need more male teachers

by Kevin Hardy - TimesFreePress.com
Rick Hall's third-grade classroom has a boy's touch.

In the back corner, a wooden fort covered in camouflage netting provides a quiet haven for reading. The students — all boys — dress in camo shirts, athletic gear and gelled hair. In their writing assignments, they pen stories about bloody shark attacks. On the book shelves, Sports Illustrated for Kids sits inches away from Dr. Seuss.
XML feed What's this?