Articles

Mister Rogers viral image: The story of the boy

By Maura Judkis - The Washington Post
The boy's name was Tommy Paulhamus. The "was" should tell you that his story does not have a happy ending. But on the day my father captured the now-iconic image of him with Mister Rogers in 1978, which was widely shared after the Newtown shootings — when he was not yet five years old, living in what was then called the Home for Crippled Children — Tommy was quite happy, indeed.

Nisswa resident one of few men in early childhood education

By Jessica Larsen - Staff Writer - Brainerd Dispatch
Bill Cruz is not your average student.

In fact, he’s the exact opposite of the 19-year-old white woman that typically sits in the desk of Jeanette Rydberg’s early childhood classes.

At 47, Cruz is the second man in two decades to graduate from Central Lakes College’s Early Childhood AAS program at the Brainerd campus.

That’s something both he and Rydberg want to change.

Special Education Doctoral student is Florida’s 2013 Teacher of the Year

By Martin Haro - Florida International University


When pre-K, special education teacher Alexandre Lopes stood on stage at the 2013 Florida Department of Education/Macy’s Teacher of the Year Award ceremony in Orlando the evening of July 12, he fully expected to hear the name of one the other four Teacher of the Year finalists announced as the winner.

Maths teacher James Whiteley nominated for Pride of Australia Medal

by Kara Vickery - PerthNow
He's the man who made a difference.

When students were ready to drop out of Willetton Senior High School, they decided to try again because of him.

When one girl didn't attend classes because she had depression, he was the one who rang her at home every day to see if she was all right.

That man is maths teacher James Whiteley, whose lessons in life went way beyond the classroom.

Movie: Children of Life

JapaneseMr. Kanamori, a teacher of a 4th grade class, teaches his students not only how to be students, but how to live. He gives them lessons on teamwork, community, the importance of openness, how to cope, and the harm caused by bullying.

Teacher of Year Davis tries to meet students where they are

By Andy Powell - Times Staff Writer
Selling cellphones might seem to be a far cry from teaching young children, but Matt Davis, the Attalla school system elementary school teacher of the year, believes his business background is a big asset.

South Carolina has 1st male Head Start teacher of the year.

By Linda Conley - (Spartanburg) Herald Journal
When a young child can identify shapes, colors and numbers, it is like planting a seed to produce good fruit for head start teacher Marcus Tate.

Nurturing a seed carefully is a lesson he learned growing up while working on the farm with his grandfather in Cherokee County. Tate, a teacher at Piedmont Community Action's Z.L. Madden Head Start Center in Spartanburg, has transferred some of those gardening tips to the classroom.

My Quest to Teach: African American Men and Teaching

by William Jackson
The recent news reports about the lack of African American teachers has caused concern that men are not choosing the profession of education. As an African American teacher at an elementary school and third generation educator. I find that effectively teaching African American youth does not rest in having more African American male teachers present in the classroom as teachers and administrators, male teachers must have a passion to teach.

Hoping Black male teachers make a difference

By Nisa Islam Muhammad - The Final Call
Spend an hour at Maya Angelou Public Charter Middle School and you immediately notice something's different. There's an abundance of Black men and they're not just custodians or security.

Advocates say schools need more male teachers

by Kevin Hardy - TimesFreePress.com
Rick Hall's third-grade classroom has a boy's touch.

In the back corner, a wooden fort covered in camouflage netting provides a quiet haven for reading. The students — all boys — dress in camo shirts, athletic gear and gelled hair. In their writing assignments, they pen stories about bloody shark attacks. On the book shelves, Sports Illustrated for Kids sits inches away from Dr. Seuss.

The Male Minority

By Sara Lenz - Deseret News
The fifth grade students in Brad Ericksen's class know what their teacher will be doing after school today. They can tell by his outfit — a navy blue shirt and khaki pants.

He'll be working at Walmart.

Kids would benefit from more male teachers, experts say

by Mary Richards - KSL.com News
Look around your child's school and you likely won't see a lot of male teachers, especially in elementary and middle schools. But research shows many kids would benefit from men in the classroom.

Report about men teaching in Florida classrooms

by Nathalie Dortonne, Alligator Contributing Writer
People are usually surprised when Marcus Knox tells them what he wants to do when he graduates. The 20-year-old UF elementary education sophomore is studying to be a middle school teacher.

After graduation, Knox will join a handful of men pursuing a career in teaching young students.

According to a United States Bureau of Labor Statistics 2012 household data report, women make up about 81 percent of elementary and middle school teachers nationwide.

Man dispels childcare myths

A young man who has set up his own business is out to dispel the myths surrounding men working in childcare.

John Eccles has established Toddle In at his Barrow home in Mosley Street, becoming only the second male childminder in the town.

The Manliness of Education Reform

by Shaun Johnson - Assistant professor of elementary education, Towson University
The contemporary education reform movement is pushing hard the narrative that teaching is a venerable and rewarding profession. Within that, I've noticed a bit of a trend lately: education reform, with reference to classroom teaching specifically, is home to a new kind of "muscular pedagogue." Take, for example, the Department of Education's recent initiative to recruit teachers.

Male teacher says career choice should not be determined by gender

By Candace Sweat - ABC3340
Walk into any grade school and look around. It's hard to find a male teacher. Less than 20 percent of teachers in elementary and middle school are men.

Experts say young boys, who often lag behind girls in academics and maturity levels, could benefit from having a male teacher.

One local teacher who says he wants students to learn early that career choice should not be determined by gender.

The Perils of Being a Male Teacher at an All-Girls School

by John Tierney
Let's all pause for a silent moment of compassion for young male teachers in all-girls high schools. Theirs is a difficult job.

Riiiiiight, some of you young men may be thinking. I'll sign up for that work.

Why There Is A Shortage Of Male Teachers In Elementary Schools?

By Susan Donaldson James - ABC News
When Philip Wiederspan began teaching first-grade at age 25, he was the only male, except for the gym teacher. His former New Jersey college friends would look at him in shock when they learned his profession: "How can you do that? You must have a lot of patience."

More men needed to work in childcare industry for balance

by Martina Simos - adelaidenow.com
More men are being encouraged to work in the childcare industry to help the balance in the largely female dominated workforce.

Latest figures show only 5.6 per cent of the national early childhood education and care workforce is male.

New student organization supports current and future male educators

By Tommy Navickas - Illinois State University
Albeit whimsical, it would be accurate to say that a chance red light in Grand Junction, Colorado, 16 years ago lead to the creation of one of Illinois State’s newest registered student organizations (RSO).

Men in female-dominated jobs

Name: Kevin Lyke, 25
Place: Saline, Mich.

I work at a before- and after-school facility in an elementary school, where I help supervise kids. I'm definitely outnumbered. Counting myself, we have five men out of a total of around 25 to 30 employees.

Most male teachers confident working with children

By Graeme Paton, Education Editor - The Telegraph
The early years workforce is still skewed dramatically towards women as a result of deeply ingrained gender stereotypes combined with fears that men will be falsely labelled as paedophiles, it is claimed.

Research by Nottingham Trent and Bedfordshire universities found that most male teachers were confident working with children aged seven or under and insisted gender was "not an issue".

Why are so many parents reluctant to hire men to care for their kids?

By Melinda Wenner Moyer - Slate.com
When my husband and I toured a preschool last week, the owner told me that her husband, a classical musician, sometimes pops in to play piano for the kids. I assumed she was trying to impress us—what parent doesn’t want a little extra Bach in her child’s life?—but then she explained, nervously, that she was telling us because she felt she had to.

Dr. Ed Klugman to receive the Steve Shuman Award in Support of Men in Early Education

by Craig Simpson - MenTeach - New England
[MenTeach - Ed Klugman has had a significant effect on the Early Education profession. Mr. Klugman has been mentioned in previous MenTeach posts. You can read an interview with him at the PBS.org site.]

For girls, teachers' gender matters, study says

by Sarah D. Sparks - Education Week
Female elementary school teachers' comfort with mathematics has an outsize effect on the girls they teach, according to new research.

Administrator Suggestions Regarding the Recruitment of Male Elementary Teachers

by Dr. Julia Wilkins, Ph.D. and Dr. Robert J. Gamble, Ph.D. - D’Youville College, Buffalo, NY
Abstract

From the front lines to the front of the class

by Greg Toppo - USA Today
Administrators are increasingly finding that many servicemembers make good teachers

Stationed for 13 months along the Afghanistan/Pakistan border in 2007 and 2008, Brian Thompson had a lot of time to wonder what could come next for him.

In charge of a mortar squad with the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division, Thompson often thought he’d go to law school once his three-and-a-half years were up.

U.S. schools seek role models for boys

Interview by Kate Hammer - The Globe & Mail
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan talks to The Globe and Mail's Kate Hammer about why boys are falling behind south of the border, and what can be done to close the gap between genders in the classroom. Teachers, he argues, will be central to addressing this problem and he and his staff are looking at ways to recruit male minorities to teaching.

Raising Boys' Achievement Involves More Male Teachers

By Jake Miller - Educator's Room
It's no shock to any reader - teacher or parent - to learn that boys are not just falling behind, they're sinking. In the middle school where I teach, of our nearly 1,100 students, roughly 80% of the special education students are male. More than 2/3 of the students failing classes are male. More than 75% of the discipline problems, again, originate with our young men.

In The Land Of Women: Being a Man in Early Childhood Education

By Theodore Kokoros - Wheelock College
About 5 years ago a movie starring Kristen Stewart, Adam Brody, and Meg Ryan came out called “In The Land of Women.” I have only seen a few parts of it while flipping through channels on cable, but the title of the movie has always stuck with me. Five days a week, I wake up and head to my main job as a Pre-K teacher at a non-profit Early Childhood Education Center in Boston where I am the only male out of the 20 or so employees.
XML feed What's this?