Articles

Male teacher shortage affects boys who need role models

by Hollie Deese, USA TODAY Back To School magazine
For 35 years, Len Saunders has been teaching physical education to elementary school children in Montville, N.J. Personally, he knows how important a strong male role model can be and hopes he is that for his students. His own father died just months before he was born, so he depended on uncles, coaches and other men to guide him in certain  areas of his physical and mental development.

Mansur’s Manifesto: How an Aspiring Black Male Teacher Plans to Turn Teaching Into Activism

by Mansur Buffins - ED Trust
Anytime I tell people that I am majoring in social studies education, they ask one of two questions: “Where do you want to teach?” or “Why do you want to teach?” Those especially curious ask both. My answer is consistent: I would like to teach in a secondary school serving predominantly low-income, African American students. And I am entering the profession as an intentional form of activism.

Male nurses? Female firefighters? Yes, as career boundaries erode.

by Schuyler Velasco - Christian Science Monitor

Men and women tend to choose different career paths, and researchers have identified this as the biggest reason men make more money. So if men and women were equally represented across all occupations, would it close that gender pay gap?

In D.C., Bringing Male Teachers Of Color To The Preschool Classroom

by Kate McGee, WAMU
When kids go back to school after the summer break, the chances of them having a male preschool teacher are pretty slim — just 2 percent of early education teachers nationally are male. And the probability of having a male teacher of color is even lower. In Washington, D.C., public schools, they're trying to change that with a new program called the "Leading Men Fellowship."

How to Become a Teacher in Lots of Steps

by Ron Clone - Racine County Eye
Training for the profession of teaching, even in 1971, was not the easiest major to enter at Michigan State. When I transferred from Central Michigan as a junior, I was headed into secondary education, as I mentioned in my initial blog entry. After the first term, I decided to switch my major to elementary after several conversations with my oldest brother and his wife, both of whom were teachers.

Why Some Of D.C.’s Leading Men Of Color Are Heading Back To Preschool

by Kate McGee - WAMU
At Turner Elementary School in Southeast D.C., Torren Cooper is the only male of color who works directly in the classroom, even though the student body is 98 percent African American. Cooper is a literacy coach helping some of Turner’s youngest pupils with their reading and writing skills, including rhyming, alliteration, letter sounds and writing their names.

Boston University professor Travis Bristol studies hiring, retention of teachers of color

by Yawu Miller - The Bay State Banner
Travis Bristol is an assistant professor in English education at the Boston University School of Education who researches district- and school-based practices that support teachers of color; national, state and local education policies that enable and constrain the workplace experiences and retention for teachers of color; the intersection of race and gender in schools.

Go Teach, Young Man: Tweaking Risk and Reward to Recruit Male Teachers

by Justin Baeder - Education Week
How do we attract more top-performing male teachers to the profession, and what role does compensation play?

EdWeek recently published an op-ed, Rethinking Teacher Compensation, by Laura Overdeck, Arthur Levine, and Christopher Daggett. The authors argue that states should reallocate compensation funding away from "backloaded" plans such as defined-benefit pensions, and toward earlier-career perks like higher starting salaries and annual bonuses.

Here's what male teachers of color want their districts to know about them

By Laura Faith Kebede - Chalkbeat
A passion for teaching and learning is what drew Archie Moss to a career in education. But the Memphis principal recalls how he almost left the profession when he found himself increasingly tasked as a disciplinarian.

Black men teachers inspiring hope

by Dale Mezzacappa - The Notebook
Stephen Flemming is one teacher in one classroom, but he may be doing as much to keep his low-income black students in school – black males in particular – as any formal program targeted toward "at-risk" students.

Flemming teaches English language arts to 5th graders at John B. Kelly Elementary School in Germantown. All but three of his students, spread over three homerooms, are African American.

How this man found his calling as an early elementary teacher

by Judy Woodruff - PBS Newshour
JUDY WOODRUFF: A question that has been raised here: Why aren’t more men going into fields dominated by women?

Stigma is a big part of the answer, our economics correspondent, Paul Solman, reported last week.

Tonight, he focuses on one man many might want to emulate.

It’s part of our weekly series Making Sense.

Life as the lone male teacher at Rail Ranch Elementary in Murrieta

by Carl Love - The Press Enterprise
I walked with my class across campus recently when some passing kid I’ve never met said, “Hi Mr. Love.”

One of my own students asked, “Why does everybody know you?”

My theory: I am the only male teacher left at my school.

Japan: Three times as many male teachers

by Aki Shibuya and Sho Beppu - NHK World
The shortage of childcare workers is a pressing social problem in big cities in Japan. There are about two and half million children who go to daycare centers, but at least 23,000 children across the nation cannot go. Because of the hard working conditions and low wages, there aren't enough people who are willing to work as caregivers.

Now, local governments are counting on more men to come on board. The number of men who are choosing to become childcare providers is increasing.

Oregon growing its own teachers

by Sheila Hagar - Union- Bulletin
The class, in its third year, is part of Eastern Oregon University’s OTP curriculum. The program is intended to entice high school and college students into considering a career in education.

The goal is two-pronged: add ethnic and linguistic diversity to the teacher workforce, and restock rural district staff rosters with homegrown teachers.  

Will More Minority Teachers Close Connecticut's Achievement Gap?

By Lea Trusty - wshu.org - public radio
According to a study from the Institute of Labor Economics, students of color are less likely to drop out of high school and more likely to pursue college if they have at least one minority teacher.

The problem is, there’s a severe shortage of teachers of color in this country. And that gap between minority students and teachers is especially wide in Connecticut.

Some new programs in the state have been designed to close that gap.

Tai Olasanoye interned at an elementary school when he was in college. Before that, he never imagined being a teacher.

This Letter A Fifth Grader Wrote To His Teacher Proves How Important It Is To Have Black Men In Classrooms

By Mariya Moseley - Essence
At a time when Black men make-up of just two percent of our nation’s teachers, this Atlanta educator is determined to make a difference.

Fifth grade teacher Jermaine Stubbs, recently shared a beautiful letter online about just how much he’s appreciated by one of his students. The letter, which has since gone viral, said, “… I look at you like my dad. I never met my real dad but it [is] okay because you treat me like I'm your son.”

Seeking to reverse lack of black male teachers in Detroit

by Holly Fournier - The Detroit News
Former Detroit Police Chief and Deputy Mayor Isaiah McKinnon keeps in touch with three of his Detroit teachers, now retired and in their early 90s.

They were his only black male teachers growing up, he said.

“I saw these strong men,” McKinnon said. “It had a true impact on my life.”

Teach for America Struggles to Attract Male Teachers

by Rick Cohen - Source: Education Week
Teach for America is typically flooded with job applicants from top colleges and universities, but according to Chanté Chambers, the managing director of recruitment at historically black colleges and universities at the New York City-based Teach For America, the high-profile teaching nonprofit isn’t flooded by male applicants. She says that low status of education is “definitely a barrier,” especially among African American men.

An all-male Buffalo Public School to address differences in learning? It's being considered

By Mike Desmond - WBFO - NPR News
Schools Superintendent Kriner Cash was clearly surprised the discussions were far enough along to be brought to the board as part of a briefing on culturally and linguistically responsive teaching. That is according to Assistant Superintendent Fatima Morrell, who is working in that much larger field.

How storytelling is giving voice to a small part of the early childhood workforce — men

By Ann Schimke - Chalkbeat
In their own words, the men described the journeys that led them to work in the early childhood field — as teachers, counselors, coaches and administrators.

Male teacher adds ties to school's male achievement lessons

by Maya Earls - Tribune Staff Writer
For more than 20 years students put on their best suits for "Male Leadership Day" at Murrell Dobbins CTE High School. Year after year, since Commercial and Advertising arts teacher Troy Stratton has been around, students struggled to tie their ties. Some students did not have a tie at all.

"We're talking about 200 — 300 young men who don't have ties," Stratton said in an interview.

Caring for Black Male Students Requires More Than Good Intentions, According to Education Study

Earlier this year, a video of English teacher Barry White Jr.'s unique handshakes with each of his students went viral. In the video, White, who is black, greeted each of his students at the predominately black elementary school with elaborate high-fives that he said were based around each student's personality and helped him connect with each child.

Southern University to increase underrepresented male teachers

Southern University is among several southern states and historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) partnering with the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association (SHEEO) to increase the number of underrepresented male teachers. SHEEO was recently awarded a three-year grant from the W.K.

Massachusetts teaching force remains dominated by women

By Matt Rocheleau - Boston Globe Staff
Despite efforts to recruit more male teachers, their numbers in Massachusetts public school classrooms remain stagnant, according to a Globe review.

About 25 percent of all public school teachers statewide last year were men. That figure has been fairly flat in recent years. But the share of male teachers is lower than it was in the early 1990s, when it was about 32 percent.

The teacher gender disparity is most pronounced at the elementary grades.

Educators’ Summit Highlights Need For More Virginia Teachers of Color

by John O’Neil - Virginia Education Association - Communications Director
Nearly one-half of students attending Virginia public schools are minorities, but fewer than one in five teachers is.

Educate ME Foundation working to grow the number of Black teachers for Black students across the country

by Curtis Bunn - Indianapolis Recorder
The axiom, "Those who cannot do, teach," missed the point, as far as Blake Nathan is concerned.

In fact, Nathan created the Educate ME Foundation on a wholly opposite premise: To mentor and encourage African-American students, high school and college, to pursue careers in education, especially as teachers—and to help existing Black teachers find new opportunities.

A-plus for effort! This cool teacher has an energetic personalized handshake for every pupil

By Rod Ardehali For Mailonline
A US primary school teacher has staked a claim at being the coolest in the world after memorising elaborate hi-five routines with each of his pupils.

Barry White Jr, an English teacher at Ashley Park Elementary School in North Carolina, has created unique handshake routines for his student and performs them every morning as they enter class.

Metro State U, Osseo make a deal to help diversify Minnesota’s teacher corps

By Pioneer Press Editorial Board
In a system as big, complex and resistant to change as that by which we educate children, efforts to innovate deserve notice.

They matter in a state that fails to educate all its children and one struggling to add diversity to its teaching corps.

With hometown pride, we make note of new work at Metropolitan State University to remove barriers that make it harder for aspiring teachers to take their places in Minnesota schools that need them.

Column: How I learned my own value as a black male teacher

By Ricky House - PBS Newshour
Article Note: Black males represent roughly 2 percent of all public school teachers in the U.S. While nonwhite educators are being hired at a higher proportional rate than white teachers, they’re also leaving the teaching profession at a higher rate, according to a 2015 report from the Albert Shanker Institute.

Path to a new life takes these minority high school graduates back to preschool

By Alejandra Matos - Washington Post
Sekani Malcolm was serving coffee and pastries at Dunkin’ Donuts last month, a 20-year-old high school graduate with no plans to go to college and few aspirations for a solid career. He had struggled in school, where he sometimes found trouble, and he was working the part-time job to help support his 3-month-old daughter.
XML feed What's this?