World News

Teacher's Day: Sir is not in class in India

by Uma Vishnu - Indian Express
If I am your class teacher, I know everything about you. I am supposed to," says Tathagata Dutta. Only minutes ago, the 31-year-old English teacher at The Shri Ram School, Gurgaon, had given a quick demonstration of those skills. Walking past a student in her football jersey, he had softly asked: "So, whom did you lose to?" "What do you mean?

Concern for vulnerable children as proportion of male teachers drops in Australia

by Jane Gilmore - The Sydney Morning Herald
Men are becoming a token presence in our children's schools. In 2016 fewer than one in five primary school teachers were men and if the current rate of decline continues male teachers will be extinct by 2050.

Tim Clark taught English and media in Melbourne for three years immediately after leaving university. After a break of six years he went back to teaching but left again four years later.

Defying assumptions but teaching with passion in India

by Akangchila Longchar - Dimapur, India
The concept that “Kindergarten teachers are always female” is a gender stereotype that a young male teacher at The Maple Tree School, Dimapur has defied. Imnawapang Changkiri has been working as a full-time kindergarten teacher for five years.

Male teachers still the minority in Western Australian schools

by Emily Baker - The Canberra Times
Julian Hofsink didn't think twice about his gender when he applied to study a Bachelor of Secondary Education at the University of Canberra.

But the second-year student will be in the minority should he work in ACT schools once he finishes his degree.

Minister of Trinidad encourages men to become caregivers

by Camille Clarke - Guardian of Trinidad & Tobago
Minister of State in the Office of the Prime Minister (Gender and Child Affairs) Ayanna Webster-Roy says men will be targeted for participation in the next cycle of the Caregivers Training Programme offered by the ministry.

Universities aim to increase Emirati interest in teaching programmes

by Roberta Pennington - UAE The National
If recent enrolment data from two of the country's two federal universities is any indication, Emirati men have very little to no interest in becoming schoolteachers.

Not one male student enrolled for Zayed University's Bachelor of Science in Education programme last year, while just 11 signed up to study at the United Arab Emirates University's College of Education.

Chinese government offers free training to men who want to be preschool teachers

Global Times
Chongqing will fund the training of 77 male nursery teachers to address the gender imbalance in the municipality's kindergartens.

According to a government notice released on April 21, the 77 candidates will receive five years of free training and be given a cash allowance during this period, news portal cqbntv.cn reported Wednesday.

According to the notice, these teachers will be required to work in the kindergartens to which they are assigned for at least six years after their training ends.

The different reasons men and women become teachers in Australia

by Pallavi Singhal - The Sydney Morning Herald
Kai Glennie didn't enjoy any of his classes, had trouble making friends and dreaded going to school every morning.

But soon after he turned 10, he decided to spend the rest of his life in the classroom, as a teacher.

Male early childhood teachers almost quadruple in New Zealand - but lobbyists point to continued 'sexism'

By Simon Collins - Education reporter, NZ Herald
Men teaching in New Zealand preschools have almost quadrupled in nine years - but lobbyists want more support to overcome persistent "sexism" in the sector.

Ministry of Education data shows that the number of male teachers in early childhood has jumped from 129 in 2005 to 494 at last count in 2014.

Kakata Rural Teacher Training Institute Graduates 151 Teachers - almost all men

Report by Yawah Jaivey, FPA Contributor
The Kakata Rural Teacher Training Institute (KRTTI) in Kakata, Margibi County has graduated about 151 trainees from its Cohorts-8 Pre-Service “C” Certificate Program.

Plans in place to attract more men to the classroom in Australia

by Stefanie Balogh - The Australian
A targeted and specific recruitment drive is needed to attract more men into the nation’s classrooms to arrest a male teacher drought, a new report finds.

The first study of its kind to ask serving teachers why they chose the profession reveals the main driving factor for all teachers is the intrinsic value of teaching, ­followed by teaching ability, and a desire to shape the future of young lives.

Men in our classrooms in New Zealand

By Claire Allison - Stuff
Features editor Claire Allison looks at what male teachers are dealing with, and why more aren't entering the profession.

When a teacher is revealed to have been sexually abusing students, shockwaves go through the affected community, and questions are asked about how it could have happened.

Alberta, Canada facing shortage of male teachers in rural areas

by Kenzie Love - Calgary Herald
At a time when most other provinces face declining school enrolment, Alberta stands out.

New Zealand Men hope to encourage more males into early childhood roles

by Koren Allpress - Stuff.co.nz
Two South Canterbury men who are studying to become early childhood education (ECE) teachers could double the number of males teaching in the region once qualified.

As of June 2014, there were just two licensed male ECE teachers employed in South Canterbury, of a total of 251 teachers in the region, according to data released by the Ministry of Education.

Trinidad and Tobago: No men to teach

It is becoming more and more difficult to attract young males to the teaching profession, says Principal of St Mary's College, Fr Ronald Mendez.

Mendez told the media yesterday at a press conference to launch the Sesquicentennial Anniversary Celebrations of the Arrival of the Holy Ghost Fathers and the Founding of St Mary's College.

Japan: Should male childcare workers' roles be limited?

The Yomiuri Shimbun - The Japan News
The Yomiuri Shimbun Controversy has arisen over whether male childcare workers at nursery facilities should be in charge of changing the clothes or diapers of girls. The context for this is concern from parents and guardians that such circumstances could lead to the sexual abuse of children. However, there is a shortage of childcare workers, and both male and female childcare workers are expected to play active roles at nursery facilities.

Japan: Should male nursery teachers change girls' clothes, diapers?

The Yomiuri Shimbun - The Japan News
A plan by the Chiba municipal government to promote the utilization of male nursery teachers has sparked intense debate on the internet about the involvement of male childcare workers in changing the clothes and diapers of infant girls.

Japan: Online debate on male nursery workers dressing girls heats up after mayor's tweet

by Mainichi - Japan
Online debate over the use of male nursery staff is heating up after the mayor of this city tweeted about some parents asking their daughters' day care centers not to have male staff members help them get dressed.

New Zealand: Women left holding the baby

Dr. Sarah Alexander - ChildForum NZ
Women today can do any job, so why do we still see large numbers of women workers in childcare kindergarten and other early childhood services?

Answers to this question usually go along the lines of: "it's a job that women are best suited to" and "what man would want to work with children anyway?"

Switzerland: How do you get more men into primary teaching?

By Isobel Leybold-Johnson - Swissinfo.ch
Men thinking of making the change into primary school teaching can now take a taster day to find out more. It's part of an initiative to boost the percentage of men in the profession in Switzerland – which currently stands at around 18%.

New figures reveal which region has the highest percentage of male teachers in England

By Zoe Stevens - Herald Express
Torbay has the highest percentage of male primary and secondary teachers in the country.

But education charity Teach First is calling for more men in the South West to become teachers, as the latest figures show a stubborn gender gap in the profession.

The latest Government statistics reveal that just 28.4 per cent of teachers in South West schools are men, although these figures were the best for any region in England.

Improving gender equality is the key to tackling Britain's male teacher shortage

by Joanne McDowell - The Conversation
As it currently stands, less than 13% of the UK's primary school teachers are male. A lot of this is down to the fact that primary teaching continues to be seen as a job only suitable for women. "Feminine" characteristics such as "caring" are seen as central to the role, and Western society mainly still envisions that it is only women – and not men – who possess such qualities.

2014 & 2016 EC-MENZ - New Zealand Reports


The 10th Annual EC-MENz Summit was held on 8th & 9th April 2016 at BTI (Bethlehem Tertiary Institute), Bay of Plenty

Celebrating the many roles of men in ECE

Wellington's Y-Men programme trying to increase the low male ECE teacher numbers

by Kris Dando - Stuff.nz
It took a terrible affliction suffered by a sibling for Anaru Jones to find his calling in life.

The 22-year-old from Stokes Valley helps out at Tui Park Kindergarten in Linden four days a week as part of programme run by Whanau Maanaki Kindergartens.

Ireland has far more female teachers than male in all sectors

by Fionnuala Jones - NewTalk 106-108fm
This is despite only 50% of women acting as principals in primary schools

Ireland continues to have more female teachers than male, according to new statistics released by the EU.

The figures, released in support of World Teachers' Day, show that 87 per cent of primary school teachers here are female while 71 per cent of positions in secondary schools were held by women.

Classrooms need more male teachers, charity says

by Katherine Sellgren BBC News education reporter
England's classrooms need more male teachers, an education charity says, as government figures show a continued gender gap in the profession.

Department for Education statistics show 26% of teachers in England are men - accounting for 38% of secondary and 15% of primary school teachers.

To mark World Teachers' Day, the charity Teach First is urging more men to consider a career in the sector.

Wanted: Cosla wants more men to work in nurseries across Scotland to solve staffing crisis

by Andrew Denholm - Herald Scotsland
More men have been urged to work in nurseries to help address a chronic shortfall in the number of childcare staff across Scotland.

An extra 18,000 new workers will be required by 2020 to meet a Scottish Government commitment to expand free childcare places, but not enough new members of staff are being trained to fill the vacancies.

Currently some 95 per cent of all students who train in childcare services at Scottish colleges are female.

Why we need more male teachers and more female principals

By Rosena Jordan - President INTO
Classrooms are a microcosm of society. In our schools, children learn the stories they will tell themselves for the rest of their lives, stories formed from the material they have around them.

What will today's primary children tell themselves about gender?

Free teacher training program for men labeled gender discrimination

Global Times
A new teacher training program has been created for men in Fujian province, Beijing News reported on Sept. 26.

The project was initiated last year by the Fujian Provincial Education Department, together with three other local departments and five teacher training universities. The purpose of the program is to ease the serious gender imbalance among primary school and kindergarten teachers.

NZ Police heads towards gender balance while the Ministry of Education holds on to sex-role stereotypes for early childhood educ

by Dr Sarah Alexander - Child Forum
New Zealand Police attempts to recruit more women have been successful and rewarded.

In 2012 just 24 per cent of new police recruits across the country were women, but last year that number jumped to nearly 36 per cent thanks to new programmes targeted specifically at females.

For police to have the trust and confidence of the community they must be representative of the people they serve, they believe.
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