World News

Scottish project to recruit young men to work in childcare

by Ross Watson - Children & Young People Now
A project in Scotland, aimed at recruiting young and unemployed men into the childcare sector, has received 50,000 pounds of funding to increase training opportunities.

The Coalfield Trust awarded the money to the Men into Childcare project, which aims to help young and unemployed men in former mining areas in East Ayrshire. The Trust was originally formed in 1999 to help mining communities recover from the impact of pit closures.

50% rise in men applying to be primary teachers

BBC News
The number of men applying for teacher training has risen sharply because of the recession, says the body responsible for training teachers.

There was a 52% rise in the number of men wanting to be primary school teachers - more than 4,700 in 2009/10, up about 1,500 compared with 2008/09.

Redundancies in the City have prompted the change, says the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA).

More than a quarter of England's primary schools have no male teachers

by Aislinn Simpson - Telegraph
More than a quarter of England's primary schools do not have a single male teacher, it has emerged, with 4,587 school staffrooms populated solely by women.
 
The figures are despite a multi-million pound Government campaign to encourage men back into what is now seen as a "feminine" career.

Irish Men In Childcare

Dublin City Childcare Committee & its neighbouring CCC's operating in Dublin are seeking to make contact with men working in Early childhood Care & Education in Dublin. The Men in Childcare Network which is based in Waterford seeks to encourage more men to consider childcare as a career.  The Network is about getting more men involved in childcare and supporting them.

Can bankers make the grade as teachers?

The room was packed so full that they were standing at the back, but we were an orderly and attentive lot. "Hands up those of you who've been into a school recently," our facilitator requested. A good number of hands shot up. "Those of you who didn't put your hands up need to get into a school," she said with a stern look.

Please, sir! We need you to teach us

by Emma Pinch, Liverpool Daily Post - UK
The children in Year 5 at St Elizabeth's, in Litherland, are in a lucky minority. Their teacher, Thomas Cox, is male and their teaching assistant is a man, too.

With soaring numbers of family break-ups, for some of these children these are the only adult males they'll have regular contact with.

But, despite the demand for men in early years childcare, the proportion of men to women is tiny.

More men teachers: Back to class for men in Australia

by Felicity Caldwell - Queensland Times
An Ipswich school is defying trends and putting men back in front of the class with more male teachers than women.

St Edmund's College has 33 male full-time teachers (57 per cent) and 25 female teachers (43 per cent) this year.

Male city primary school teachers in UK

Tim Caldwell is something of a rarity in Nottingham - a male primary school teacher.

City council figures show he is one of only 161, compared to 1,052 women.

In 2004, there were 187 male primary school teachers and 1,048 female.

But Mr Caldwell believes more men should follow his example.

He said: "It is something I really enjoy. I originally went into teaching at secondary schools, but it wasn't for me - I found it more like crowd control at times.

Visiting the other hemisphere: New Zealand's Men in Early Childhood Education

Bryan G. Nelson - MenTeach.org
I'm in New Zealand right now getting ready for a presentation to the 4th Annual Men in Early Childhood Summit. I'm spending time with one of the guys, Robin Christie and his wife and kids I met in Belfast, Ireland - the World Forum.

More men turn hand to teaching

by Jarrod Booker - New Zealand Herald
The economic downturn is believed to be behind a jump in men training to be teachers - a welcome development for schools trying to even up the gender balance.

But while secondary schools are pleased to see more male teachers coming through, they say recruiting and retaining enough suitable staff remains a problem.

Massey University's College of Education has almost doubled the number of men in its secondary school Graduate Diploma of Teaching course this year, up from 35 to 65.

Parents want more male primary school teachers

by Catherine Mary Evans, Western Mail - Wales, UK


Parents want more men to work in nurseries and primary schools so youngsters can have access to male role models from an early age, according to two new reports.

Research by the Children's Workforce Development Council found that lone parents were particularly keen to see men involved in early years childcare.

A survey of more than 1,000 parents of young children found that 55% wanted a male childcare worker for their nursery-aged child, rising to two thirds among single parents.

Bringing men into nurseries

Contact with male role models is a vital part of growing up. Outside their own family, the best places for young children to meet such role models are nurseries and schools.

But while a new survey has found that 55 per cent of parents, and 66 per cent of single parents, want a male childcare worker for their nursery-aged child, the reality is that only 2 per cent of childcare workers are men.

Male teacher: a most wanted man

by Naomi Westland - Telegraph.co.uk
There is currently such a shortage of male primary school teachers that when one starts working at your child's school he is often welcomed with the kind of fanfare usually associated with the discovery of a new species.

Matthew is only man out of 70 childcare students at University

by Joanna Desira, Evening Gazette - UK
When Matthew Ruddy saw his primary school's first male teacher walk through his classroom's door he knew he wanted to work with children.

More than 10 years later 19-year-old Matthew is training at the University of Teesside to work in childcare.

Mums want more male nursery staff

Parents are calling for a fresh recruitment drive of male teachers as a survey shows most children from single mother households have little contact time with a male role model.

Single mothers expressed concern about their children having little contact with men in a caring capacity. A majority said they would like a man to be involved in the care and development of their young children.

Can men really work with toddlers?

Hugo Rifkind - London Times
Hardly any men work as early years carers, and more are wanted. But can they cope with the glitter, paint and mashed potato?

Call for more male nursery staff: Childcare 'not just for women'

Men are being urged to take jobs in nurseries after a survey suggested many parents want their toddlers to have more contact with male role models.

For every 100 people working in childcare, only two are men.

The Children's Workforce Development Council questioned 1,000 parents about the issue of men working in nurseries.

4th Men in Early Childhood Education Summit 2010 in New Zealand

February - Saturday 13th – Sunday 14th, 2010

A man teaching in a Vietnam nursery school

If you visit Duc Tho town's nursery school you might see a man carefully spoon-feeding children and covering them with blankets.

He is Luong Xuan Phong, believed to be the only male nursery school teacher in Vietnam.

Male Teachers in Korea

A YTN TV reporter recently examined the phenomenon of the shrinking number of men teaching in Korean elementary schools, and quotes a few women who worry that women teachers can't control the kids, who furthermore are not learning about their correct gender roles.

[Anchor] These days it's not easy to find a male elementary school teacher. It has finally gotten to the point where some schools have no male teachers at all. Seong Mun-gyu reports.

Childcare 'not just for women'

By Margaret Ryan - BBC News
As new research suggests parents want more men to work in nurseries, one man who runs a pre-school explains what it is like working in a profession dominated by women.

When Duncan Wise first went into childcare nearly 12 years ago, he came across some negative attitudes from parents.

Men teaching in Vietnam

People are often surprised when Le Minh Hien tells them what he does for a living.

Hien, 35, has been working at the city's District 3 Kindergarten for 10 years. He is one of only a handful of male kindergarten teachers in the country.

According to statistics from the municipal Department of Education and Training, of the 12,800 kindergarten teachers working during the 2008-09 academic year, only 29 are male.

"Whever I have a day off, I really miss the little kids from my class," said Hien.

Male teachers say they are more likely to experience disrupted classes

Schoolchildren are more likely to disrupt lessons if they have a male teacher, a survey suggests.

The National Union of Teachers (NUT) polled 1,500 of its members in 13 English local authorities.

Although the survey found a general improvement in pupil behaviour since 2001, 77% of males said they had a lesson disrupted at least once a week.

Gender gap in teaching grows: Only 24% of new recruits in UK are men

by Sarah Cassidy, Education Correspondent
Teaching is becoming an increasingly female-dominated profession with men making up fewer than one in four new recruits, official figures revealed yesterday.

Despite a multimillion-pound campaign to attract more men into teaching, the latest statistics reveal a widening gap between the sexes among those gaining teaching qualifications from universities and teacher training colleges.

Report from Men in Early Childhood Education in Austria

by Dr. Tim Rohrmann - research project elementar
Lately, the field of Early Childhood Education (ECE) has been widely debated in Austria. Raising requirements for Early Childhood Educators to the tertiary level, making a Bache-lor’s degree mandatory, is one of the major issues. Another issue gaining a lot of attention is last year’s decision by several Austrian provinces to keep pre-school year free of charge.

Why don't men want to teach?

by John Crace, The Guardian
Primary schools have long been an almost entirely man-free zone, but research published last week suggests that secondary schools could soon be heading the same way. According to the Higher Education Statistics Agency 23.8% of those qualifying to become teachers in 2006-07 were men - a fall of 1.5% on the previous year and the lowest figure over the past five. Despite repeated government drives to recruit more male teachers, men just aren't that interested.

What do children think: Does it matter if your teacher is male?

Childrens' BBC - United Kingdom
What do the children think? Read comments from children from Europe about their beliefs about having a male teacher.

Boys can do better at school when their teachers are also male, according to a survey.

Few male teachers, but does it matter?

by Edmonton Journal - Canada
When Gregg Brain first considered a career in teaching, he thought he would spend his days where he found so many of his own mentors -- in a high school gymnasium.

On a recent morning, Brain prepared for the school year in a very different environment -- a classroom filled with coat hooks hung low on the wall and plastic chairs designed for 10-year-olds. Brain, 26, is starting his career not as a high school physical education teacher, but as an elementary educator.

Boys do better when they are taught by men, study finds

by Richard Garner, Education editor - Independent, United Kingdom
Boys will perform better in education if they have a male teacher in their primary school, according to research published today.

A study of more than 1,000 men reveals almost half of them (48 per cent) cited male primary school teachers as having had the most impact on them during their school life.

In addition, 35 per cent said having a male teacher challenged them to work harder at school while 22 per cent said males had boosted their confidence in their own ability.

A gender divide is increasing in the professions

by Mary Dejevsky - Independent - United Kingdom
Dr Brian McKinstry of Edinburgh University is a brave man. Writing in the latest issue of the British Medical Journal, he described the increasing number of women doctors as "bad for medicine" and forecast a staffing crisis down the line.
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