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MenTeach E-News - August 2019

MenTeach E-News
August 2019

1) Men in primary schools put up with unfair comments about their health, appearance and career progress, says this teacher.
2) Inequality in day-care centres: Male educators are more likely to work temporary
3) Letter: Invitation to Participate in a Study
4) Men’s Stories: Peter Tabichi - The 2019 Global Teacher Prize winner
5) Scholarships for Minority Males in California
6) Oh Boy! Strategies for Teaching Boys in Early Childhood
7) Do boys need more male teachers?

Encouraging More Men to Teach Elementary Education

NC State University
Stephen McKinney comes from a long line of educators and advocates in North Carolina. His mother and grandmother were elementary and middle school teachers, and his sister began her first year in the classroom last fall. His father was a prominent figure in the fight for LGBTQ equality in the state and still advocates for underrepresented communities today.

I'm a Black Teacher Who Works for a Black Principal. It's Been a Game Changer

by Gemayel Hazard - Education Week Teacher
I’m a black male elementary teacher, and I’ve just finished my first year working for a black principal. It’s been incredible. I’m fortunate to have worked with school leaders of all races and genders. But perhaps because of his life experiences, my current principal has a certain mix of rare qualities that have created a powerfully positive working environment for me.

It hasn’t always been that way in my teaching career. I’ve felt sidelined, misunderstood, and disrespected at some of the other schools where I’ve taught. It’s just the opposite in my new job.

No Man’s Land: Where Are the Male Daycare Caregivers?

Noam Shpancer, Ph.D - Psychology Today
A gender-segregated caregiving profession is not optimal for children.

Most U.S. children today grow up in a dual ecology, spending significant time in both home and daycare. Child daycare in the U.S. is a messy hodgepodge of arrangements varying in quality, size, and scope as well as in their philosophies, goals, affiliations, and regulatory status. Yet one central unifying characteristic remains: Male caregivers are virtually nonexistent. This is a problem for several reasons.

Whether Charter or Public, Schools Need More Black Male Teachers

By Coron A. Brinson - Post News Group
Throughout my career as a Black male teacher, I’ve taught in district and charter schools. While many remain determined to highlight their differences, they’re one and the same when it comes to their failure to serve Black children and their inability to attract and retain quality teachers who look like them.
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