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MenTeach E-News - January 2019

MenTeach E-News
January 2019

1) For the first time in history the percentage of men in child care increases to highest level
2) Study: Male Teachers Are More Likely to Leave a School With a Female Principal
3) Study reports how race matters in the classroom
4) More diversity called for in New Zealand's classrooms - but it's not everything
5) Scholarships for Minority Males in California
6) MenTeach January Meeting: Men in Early Childhood Education in Boston
7) England: Why it’s hard being a male primary teacher

England: Why it’s hard being a male primary teacher

By Adam Black - TES
Men in primary schools put up with unfair comments about their health, appearance and career progress, says this teacher.

Letter: Thank you for the 2018 NAEYC Award

Dr. Valora Washington - Council for Professional Recognition
To the members of the NAEYC Men in Education Network (M.E.N.):

I’d like to send out a heartfelt Thank You to all of you for honoring me on Nov. 16 with this year’s Champion for Men and Children Award.

It is a profound honor and privilege to know many of you  and to have worked with you over the years.

It is especially gratifying that it came from a group of people that I admire so much for all of the hard work that you do in the early childhood education field.

Editorial: Men Students Experiencing the NAEYC 2018 Conference in Washington DC

by Dr. Jill Klefstad - UW Stout
Last month I had the privilege of presenting at the NAEYC conference in Washington D. C. What was even more of an honor and thrill was that I took two of our male students, Dylan and Andrew, to the conference. Together we presented our research about the dispositions men use to engage children in learning.

For the first time in history the percentage of men in child care increases to highest level

MenTeach.org
(MINNEAPOLIS) – MenTeach has announced for the first time in United States history, the percentage of men working in child care has increased to 6.3%. Since the 1970s the percentages have ranged from 2.1% to 5.9% but has only been above the 6% threshold once in 1975 at 6.2% (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics).
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