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MenTeach E-News - November 2016

MenTeach E-News
November 2016


1) Thoughts from the Inaugural Northern California Men and Child Care Conference
2) 2016 National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) report and Awards
3) Wellington's Y-Men programme trying to increase the low male ECE teacher numbers
4) 2014 & 2016 EC-MENZ - New Zealand Reports
5) Improving gender equality is the key to tackling Britain's male teacher shortage
6) New figures reveal which region has the highest percentage of male teachers in England

Men in Early Childhood-Colorado Audio Digital Story Project

Soren Gall
Over the last six months, Men in Early Childhood-Colorado has been working on an audio digital story project. The purpose of this project was to gather stories from men who are studying ECE, working in the ECE field currently, or had worked in the ECE field.

Students Of Color Increasing And Teachers Of Color Not - Here’s Why And What We Can Do About It

by Doris A. Smith-Ribner - Pittsburg Courier
Promoting diversity to increase the number of Black male teachers, and Hispanic male teachers, in public schools is vital to improving the educational outcomes for boys and young men of color to put them on a path to success.

Lack of African-American male educators is killing public education

By Roosevelt Mitchell III - St. Louis Post-Dispatch
According to researchers Ana Maria Villegas and Jacqueline Jordan Irvine, minority teachers, as role models, improved the self-worth of minority students. Others found that a diverse teaching population improved academic achievement for minorities along with the educational climate for white students.

New figures reveal which region has the highest percentage of male teachers in England

By Zoe Stevens - Herald Express
Torbay has the highest percentage of male primary and secondary teachers in the country.

But education charity Teach First is calling for more men in the South West to become teachers, as the latest figures show a stubborn gender gap in the profession.

The latest Government statistics reveal that just 28.4 per cent of teachers in South West schools are men, although these figures were the best for any region in England.
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