News

Black men teachers inspiring hope

by Dale Mezzacappa - The Notebook
Stephen Flemming is one teacher in one classroom, but he may be doing as much to keep his low-income black students in school – black males in particular – as any formal program targeted toward "at-risk" students.

Flemming teaches English language arts to 5th graders at John B. Kelly Elementary School in Germantown. All but three of his students, spread over three homerooms, are African American.

MenTeach E-News - May 2017

MenTeach E-News
May 2016

1) New Zealand Men hope to encourage more males into early childhood roles
2) Seeking to reverse lack of black male teachers in Detroit
3) This Letter A Fifth Grader Wrote To His Teacher Proves How Important It Is To Have Black Men In Classrooms
4) Will More Minority Teachers Close Connecticut's Achievement Gap?
5) Oregon growing its own teachers
6) Japan: Three times as many male teachers
7) Life as the lone male teacher at Rail Ranch Elementary in Murrieta

How this man found his calling as an early elementary teacher

by Judy Woodruff - PBS Newshour
JUDY WOODRUFF: A question that has been raised here: Why aren’t more men going into fields dominated by women?

Stigma is a big part of the answer, our economics correspondent, Paul Solman, reported last week.

Tonight, he focuses on one man many might want to emulate.

It’s part of our weekly series Making Sense.

Life as the lone male teacher at Rail Ranch Elementary in Murrieta

by Carl Love - The Press Enterprise
I walked with my class across campus recently when some passing kid I’ve never met said, “Hi Mr. Love.”

One of my own students asked, “Why does everybody know you?”

My theory: I am the only male teacher left at my school.

Japan: Three times as many male teachers

by Aki Shibuya and Sho Beppu - NHK World
The shortage of childcare workers is a pressing social problem in big cities in Japan. There are about two and half million children who go to daycare centers, but at least 23,000 children across the nation cannot go. Because of the hard working conditions and low wages, there aren't enough people who are willing to work as caregivers.

Now, local governments are counting on more men to come on board. The number of men who are choosing to become childcare providers is increasing.
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