Key Articles

'Young Black Men [Should] See Black Men in Front of Them' -- This Detroit Teacher

By Quan Neloms -
I began teaching at 22. Back in my hometown of Detroit and fresh out of college, I thought I had all the answers.

I believed students would instantly relate to me because of my knowledge, enthusiasm and youth.

Ha!

History Lesson: Public school teachers - Legacy of low pay and little respect

Winona Daily News Centennial Edition Nov. 20, 1955
Only women taught school in the very first years of Winona's public school history. The low pay ($20 a month) did not attract men. Secondly, women, it seems, were considered more capable of handling the difficult discipline problems which cropped up in classes composed of children of so many different ages and backgrounds.

The Repercussions of the Black Teacher Shortage

by Mimi Kirk - Citylab
A recent study found that black students who have at least one black teacher do better in school. Making policy around this research is complicated.

Why young Latino men don't think of becoming teachers

by Gary Warth - The San Diego Union-Tribune
San Marcos High School student Brayan Reyes never thought of teaching as a career. Why would he?

Until he was in Efron Solano’s class last semester, the 16-year-old had never even seen a male Latino teacher.

“He’s the one who motivated me,” Brayan said. ​

Important need exists for minority teachers in our schools

by Esther Cepeda - Sioux City Journal
Black teachers make a difference.

I know because I attended a prestigious college-preparatory public high school in the heart of Chicago where approximately half of the teachers were black. They included my AP Biology teacher and AP English teacher, several of my art teachers, one of my history teachers, a chemistry teacher -- and probably many more I'm forgetting in the haze of the past quarter-century.

Increasing diversity in teaching is the aim of university in Washington

Auburn Reporter - State of Washington, USA
The racial diversity of teachers in six school districts in South King County is low relative to the racial makeup of the districts’ students, according to data from Washington’s Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction.

October 2015 figures from the Auburn, Kent, Federal Way, Highline, Renton and Tukwila districts reveal that students of color make up 69 percent of the total population of nearly 105,000 students – while classroom teachers of color account for only 15 percent of the nearly 6,000 classroom teachers in these six districts.

Male Teacher Initiative - Today's Students, Tomorrow's teachers

Nearly one quarter, 24% of Today's Students, Tomorrow's Teachers (TSTT) students are male.

Male recruitment advocates discuss gender gap with students

By Nathan Hickling - The Sundial
Advocates that aim to close the gender gap in education met on Friday in the USU to discuss the causes and solutions for the lack of male educators in public schools, who make up a smaller percentage of educators today than they did in 1980.

Kellogg Foundation Awards CSUN Grant to Tackle California’s Teacher Shortage – MenTeach lead consultant

by Carmen Ramos Chandler - California State University - Northridge
California faces a looming teacher shortage, and, in particular, a deficit in the number of men interested in working in elementary education.

How Rochester Schools Grapple With Their Teacher Diversity Gap

By Evan Dawson - WXXI Radio
Christopher Fields is rare in the teaching profession. He’s an African-American man, and he teaches sixth-grade English at East Lower School. According to the U.S. Department of Education, you'd have to stop by more than 50 classrooms in this country before you found one black male teacher.

Lack of African-American male educators is killing public education

By Roosevelt Mitchell III - St. Louis Post-Dispatch
According to researchers Ana Maria Villegas and Jacqueline Jordan Irvine, minority teachers, as role models, improved the self-worth of minority students. Others found that a diverse teaching population improved academic achievement for minorities along with the educational climate for white students.

Philly Organization Hopes to Recruit 1,000 Black Male Teachers by 2020

by Brian Thomas - Philadelphia Magazine
A group of local teachers has put together a plan to increase recruitment of black men into the profession.

What’s sex got to do with it? The preparation of elementary male teacher candidates

by Shartriya Stewart, Letoynia Coombs & Betty Burston
This paper examines the experiences and outcomes of male teacher candidates in the College of Education at a large university in California.

Design/methodology/approach

Why lack of male teachers could be the reason boys fail in the classroom

By Laura Clark - Daily Mail
[MenTeach: Please note that this is an article from 2012 but still holds relevant research]

Schools need more male teachers because boys make less effort in women's classes, a new study claimed today.

The shortage of men in school staffrooms could be one reason for the under-achievement of boys, researchers found.

Bearded, Beardless and Fearless in Wisconsin

Dr. Jill M. Klefstadd, Program Director, University of Wisconsin - Stout
[MenTeach: Dr. Jill has been working to increase and retain men in her education program. We asked her to write about her experiences as a woman facilitator.] It was a moment of great anticipation and excitement as I sat among a group of young male early childhood preservice students gathering to adopt the by-laws to their newfound student organization. The leader of the group, a senior named Jake, began with introductions by asking each member to share one interesting fact about them.

Closing the Gender Gap: 20 Top Teacher Ed Colleges for Men

Early Childhood Teacher
[MenTeach: This is an interesting site that offers summary information about the states and universities with the highest percentage of men in education programs.]

World Data about Male Teachers: How many men in the world taught in 1996? 2012?

MenTeach: We came across this collection of data about the percentage of men and women teaching all over the world. It's interesting to do a comparison between 1996 and 2012 (the latest data).

Ten new University Programs to teach men teachers

MidAmerica Nazarene University announced that it is one of 10 universities nationwide selected by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education to participate in the Association’s first Networked Improvement Community (NIC).

The initiative of this group is aimed at increasing the diversity of the nation’s teacher candidate pool by focusing on recruitment of more Black and Hispanic/Latino men in teacher preparation programs.

Nigeria and Lesotho in Africa recruiting more men to teaching

During the 2014 World Forum in Puerto Rico we met some wonderful people who are working to increase the percentage of men teaching and working for gender equity.

World Forum 2014 a great success in Puerto Rico

The World Forum 2014 in Puerto Rico was an incredible success!

There were over 830 delegates representing more than 81 countries. It's such a unique opportunity to meet so many interesting people, doing amazing things caring for young children. Many of us attended and made some great connections with new people and reacquainting with previous friends.

Minority male teacher shortage prompts legislation that aims to boost their numbers

By Jessica Calefati/The Star-Ledger
Minority male teachers are scarce in New Jersey’s public schools—and in classrooms across the country—but a bill moving through the state Legislature aims to attract more of them to some of the state’s struggling school districts.

The legislation, sponsored by Assemblywoman Pamela Lampitt (D-Camden), would create a pilot program to encourage African-American, Hispanic and Asian men to leave their private-sector jobs, earn alternate-route certification and teach in certain failing school districts.

Black Male Teachers: Becoming Extinct? Show Me the Numbers

By Ivory A. Toldson, Ph.D. - The Root
Many media sources have propagated the view that black male teachers are "becoming extinct." Currently, black males represent less than 2 percent of the nation's teacher workforce. One article suggests that black males are underrepresented in the teaching profession because they prefer to pursue more lucrative careers.

Nurturing Men

by Maja Beckstrom - Pioneer Press
Bryan Nelson wants to see more men on the playground and in the classroom.

Two-year-old Emme Sugnet's feet came out from under her at the top of a playground slide. She slid a couple feet flat on her back wearing that puzzled look toddlers get when trying to decide if they're wounded. Then she burst into tears. "I want my mommy!" she cried.

Bryan Nelson scooped her up and held her close.

"I know you do," he murmured. "Of course you do."

Does Gender Make a Difference? First results from the German ‘tandem study’ of female and male ECE workers

Paper presented on the international conference “Men in early childhood education and care”, Berlin 2012
[MenTeach: At the international conference Men in early childhood education and care” in Berlin 2012 I had the opportunity to talk with both Dr. Holger Brandes and Markus Andrä about their research. Dr. Brandes presentation (in German with English interpreters) was both interesting and engaging. You'll want to download the entire paper and watch for future results.]

Alternative Teacher Training Programs Better at Attracting Male and Minority Trainees

by Jennifer Cohen - Ed Money Watch
Teacher training and quality has long been a topic of discussion among policymakers, especially as states have expanded access to alternative teacher training programs outside of traditional schools of education. While many remain skeptical about the effectiveness and worth of such programs, 45 states have implemented alternative routes to certification and 11 percent of teacher trainees attend such programs.

Fathers would be more involved if there were more male staff

A survey with results from nearly 500 Minnesota fathers and 250 early childhood education professionals and practitioners reveals key findings:

98% Parents welcome men into childcare

by Anna Davis, Education Correspondent - London Evening Standard
Almost all parents would be happy for their children to be looked after by male nursery workers, new research shows.

There has been a "sea change" in attitudes since a survey six years ago found that only 55 per cent of parents accepted the idea of men working with their children.

Parents voice overwhelming support for more men in childcare

By Janaki Mahadevan - Children & Young People Now
Parental opinion on male childcarers is warming after a survey by a group of major nursery providers found 98 per cent of parents are in favour of men looking after their children.

The Major Providers' Group, made up of 14 of the largest nursery chains in the UK, has found that the vast majority of the 1,200 parents questioned would be happy for men to work with children aged three to five in day nurseries.

Council of European Union Recommends Increasing the Percentage of Male Teachers in ECE

MenTeach: The Council of European Union's conclusions on early childhood education and care: providing all our children with the best start for the world of tomorrow:

Male Teachers Get Top Marks: Children have a better perception of male teachers

by Zoe McKay - Business.In.com
In today's world, as taxpayers everywhere are concerned over paying for schools, it comes as a shock to see that, according to new findings by Amine Ouazad, an Assistant Professor of Economics and Political Science at INSEAD, one of the most effective ways to get students to listen and work hard is to put a male teacher at the front of the classroom.
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